Pharma

Johnson & Johnson drops cursive from its logo

The new logo is largely unchanged from the one adopted in 1887 except for the print letters.
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It’s not just elementary schools that are doing away with cursive: After 135+ years, Johnson & Johnson (J&J) has decided to scrap its script logo in favor of a more modern font.

The new logo—which is largely unchanged from the one introduced in 1887 except for the print, or block letters—aims to deliver “a sense of unexpectedness and humanity,” and reflects the company’s “next chapter,” executives announced on Thursday.

“Our J&J brand identity communicates our bold approach to innovation in healthcare, while staying true to the care we have for our patients around the world,” Vanessa Broadhurst, J&J’s EVP of global corporate affairs, said in a statement.

The updated branding is set to roll out “over time.” The move comes amid a high-profile legal fight surrounding claims that Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder caused cancer.

In addition to the updated logo, the company is also integrating its medical technology and pharmaceutical segments under the J&J brand, executives said. Janssen—J&J’s pharmaceutical segment—will be branded as Johnson & Johnson Innovative Medicine, while the medtech segment will remain Johnson & Johnson MedTech.

“Uniting our diverse businesses under an updated J&J brand reflects our unique ability to reimagine healthcare through transformative innovation, while staying true to Our Credo values and the level of care that patients and doctors expect of us,” J&J CEO and Chairman of the Board Joaquin Duato said in a statement.

Navigate the healthcare industry

Healthcare Brew covers pharmaceutical developments, health startups, the latest tech, and how it impacts hospitals and providers to keep administrators and providers informed.